1. dialogue.dog
  2. Nutrient Wizard
  3. Monday, 10 June 2019
I think I am having trouble accurately recording nutrient information for a product I use, Grizzly Salmon Oil. The manufacturer is all over the map with their measurement units which is making my head hurt. I think I have everything correct except Vitamin D. The value I come up with for Vitamin D is 2500mcg per 100 grams. Every time I add even a teaspoon of oil to a recipe I get an insanely high, approaching toxic, level of Vitamin D. Either I screwed up the conversion or my dogs have been overdosing on Vitamin D.


http://www.grizzlypetproducts.com/grizzly-salmon-oil/
Product Page

http://www.grizzlypetproducts.com/how-many-calories-are-in-your-salmon-or-pollock-oil/
30 calories per pump of the 64 oz bottle
I have measured that 1 pump = 1 tsp. According to the product label 0.7 tsp = 3.5 grams of oil

http://www.grizzlypetproducts.com/what-vitamins-are-in-grizzly-wild-salmon-oil/
Vitamin A: 250 IU per gram
Vitamin D: 100 IU per gram

http://www.grizzlypetproducts.com/does-grizzly-salmon-oil-contain-vitamin-e-if-so-what-type-of-vitamin-e-and-how-much/
Vitamin E: 115 - 160 IU per kg

355mg DHA per pump of the 64 oz bottle
320mg EPA per pump of the 64 oz bottle
(I pump is approximately 1 tsp and 0.7 tsp is approximately 3.5 grams)
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Hi dialogue.dog,

I have made some slight alterations to your calculations.

Please enter the values below for Grizzly Salmon Oil (see attached pdfs).

0.72 teaspoons = 3.264 grams

Energy = 29.346624 kcal
Total Fat = 3.260736 grams
Moisture = 0.003264 grams

EPA = 320 mg
DHA = 355 mg

Vitamin A = 816 IU as retinol
Vitamin D = 326.4 IU
Vitamin E = 0.4896 mg


NOTES

For 16, 32 and 64 oz bottles, one pump equals 0.12 fluid ounces (3.5 ml).

The gram weight of 0.12 fluid ounces of salmon oil is 3.264 grams. This is also equivalent to 0.72 US teaspoons or 0.71 metric teaspoons.

Vitamin A: approximately 250 IU per gram of oil

Therefore, Vitamin A = 250 (3.264) = 816 IU per pump

Vitamin D: approximately 100 IU per gram of oil

Therefore, Vitamin D = 100 (3.264) = 326.4 IU per pump

One gram of salmon oil has 0.15 mg (Vitamin E).

Therefore, Vitamin E = 0.15 (3.264) = 0.4896 mg per pump.
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Animal Nutritionist and Lead Developer for Pet Diet Designer
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Something is still odd. I think I entered everything correctly but the Vitamin D level is still high. 1 tsp contains 209.2% of the RA for a 54 lb dog. That seems utterly insane.
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You are very welcome, dialogue.dog .
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I am going to mark this thread as resolved. Thanks Frank for your help.
Animal Nutritionist and Lead Developer for Pet Diet Designer
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I wouldn’t do that. I edited my reply. I think there is still a problem either with the figures or my data entry. I am still getting Vitamin D amounts approaching toxic levels for even a small amount of oil.
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What amount are you using? And how much does your dog weigh? And what life stage?
Animal Nutritionist and Lead Developer for Pet Diet Designer
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1 tsp
54.4 lbs
Senior, 10 year-old spayed female with a typical activity level
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This morning, I deleted my entry for the oil. Created a new entry and created a new recipe with the oil as the only ingredient. The situation is worse.

The Vitamin D level in a single teaspoon is now 643.92% which is above the safe limit.
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Hi dialogue.dog,

One teaspoon is too much. Use less or do not use this product at all.
Animal Nutritionist and Lead Developer for Pet Diet Designer
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Given that according to the product label a +50lb dog should receive 2 pumps, almost 2tsp, a day I think "not at all" is the best option. At the manufacturers recommended amount my dogs are getting almost 1300% the RA of Vitamin D, well beyond the safe upper limit of 588%.

Thank you for all of your help.
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Hi dialogue.dog,

Please do not go by the manufacturer's/distributor's recommendations. There are very few companies that have actually hired an animal nutritionist. Please always go by what PDD recommends. We are the most accurate pet nutrition software on the planet. If our software says that one teaspoon is too much, then that is what you go by.
Animal Nutritionist and Lead Developer for Pet Diet Designer
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Also please copy this conversation to the distributor. We have had other requests for this product. We would be happy to help the distributor to correct their recommendations.
Animal Nutritionist and Lead Developer for Pet Diet Designer
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I don't know about "most accurate on the planet" as I have nothing to compare you against. Using your software has been educational for sure. :p

If only your software could help me figure out how to balance recipes with sleep. :D

As you suggested I sent a message to the manufacturer. We shall see if they respond.
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Hi dialogue.dog,

Yes we are the most accurate pet nutrition software on the planet. We have been evaluated by independent food testing laboratories on 3 different continents and we are used in veterinary teaching universities and by animal nutrition professionals in 68 countries.
Animal Nutritionist and Lead Developer for Pet Diet Designer
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